The House Ways & Means Committee is set to review a slate of bills addressing trade with China, among which is a bill to renew the Generalized System of Preferences (“GSP”)—which expired in 2020—until 2030. The “Generalized System of Preferences Reform Act” proposes the “largest reforms to the GSP program since inception,” including permanently banning China from eligibility for GSP treatment. The bill would also update other product eligibility criteria, increasing the rule of origin (“ROO”) requirement from 35 to 50 percent, updating the competitive needs limitations (“CNLs”) by increasing the threshold from $215 million to $500 million, and directing the International Trade Commission (“ITC”) to conduct a new economic analysis to identify possible changes to products eligible for duty-free treatment as part of the GSP program. As it stands, the bill is currently awaiting a vote in the House.

Read the text of the bill here.

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Photo of John Brew John Brew

John Brew is the co-chair of Crowell & Moring’s International Trade Group and a partner in the firm’s Washington, D.C. office. He has extensive experience in import and export trade regulation, and he regularly advises corporations, trade associations, foreign governments, and non-governmental organizations…

John Brew is the co-chair of Crowell & Moring’s International Trade Group and a partner in the firm’s Washington, D.C. office. He has extensive experience in import and export trade regulation, and he regularly advises corporations, trade associations, foreign governments, and non-governmental organizations on matters involving customs administration, enforcement, compliance, litigation, legislation and policy.

John represents clients in proceedings at the administrative and judicial levels, as well as before Congress and the international bureaucracies that handle customs and trade matters. He advises clients on all substantive import regulatory issues handled by U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, such as classification, valuation, origin, marking, tariff preference programs, other agency regulations, admissibility, import restrictions, quotas, drawback, audits, prior disclosures, penalties, investigations, Importer Self Assessment and Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism programs, importations under bond, the Jones Act, vessel repairs, and foreign trade zone matters.