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John Brew is the co-chair of Crowell & Moring's International Trade Group and a partner in the firm’s Washington, D.C. office. He has extensive experience in import and export trade regulation, and he regularly advises corporations, trade associations, foreign governments, and non-governmental organizations on matters involving customs administration, enforcement, compliance, litigation, legislation and policy.

John represents clients in proceedings at the administrative and judicial levels, as well as before Congress and the international bureaucracies that handle customs and trade matters. He advises clients on all substantive import regulatory issues handled by U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, such as classification, valuation, origin, marking, tariff preference programs, other agency regulations, admissibility, import restrictions, quotas, drawback, audits, prior disclosures, penalties, investigations, Importer Self Assessment and Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism programs, importations under bond, the Jones Act, vessel repairs, and foreign trade zone matters.

On Saturday, November 12, 2022, Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Chris Magnus, resigned following tensions between Magnus and Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas over how to handle increasing numbers of migrant people at the southern border. DHS officials have reported that Secretary Mayorkas informed Magnus on Wednesday that he should either

On November 10, 2022, the U.S. Department of Commerce (“Commerce”) announced that it has reclassified Russia as a nonmarket economy, meaning that it will no longer treat Russia as a market economy in antidumping (AD) proceedings. This is an unprecedented move because it is the first time that Commerce upgraded a country to market economy

On Tuesday (Nov. 1, 2022), the Office of the United States Trade Representative (“USTR”) released a preview of its questionnaire seeking comments on the effectiveness and impacts of the additional duties levied on Chinese-origin goods enacted under Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974 (“Section 301 tariffs”).  The Section 301 tariffs, which commenced in

Yesterday U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) released its updated  Customs Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (CTPAT) Trade Compliance handbook [here].  The handbook provides importers guidance on the internal controls needed to become a CTPAT Trade Compliance member, including guidance on the necessary requirements to ensure forced labor compliance. The CTPAT program provides benefits

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) announced on Wednesday in a Federal Register notice that it is seeking public comments on the effectiveness of Section 301 tariffs on Chinese goods. The docket to post comments will open on November 15, 2022 and close on January 17, 2023. USTR welcomes any interested party to

On Monday, lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives proposed a bipartisan bill aimed at providing relief to U.S. importers who paid tariffs on goods that would have been eligible for preferential treatment under the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP), which expired on December 31, 2020. This bill would retroactively apply preferential treatment to products

On August 4, 2022, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) published notice adding entities to the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act’s (UFLPA’s) Entity List.  Per Section 2(d)(2)(B) of the UFLPA – which was signed by President Biden on December 23, 2021 – the Department of Homeland Security on behalf of the Forced Labor Enforcement Task

On Monday, August 1st, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) filed remand results with the U.S. Court of International Trade (CIT), releasing updated explanations for retaliatory tariffs on roughly $300 billion worth of Chinese goods imposed in the midst of the U.S. – China Trade War. USTR filed the remand as