On 13 February, the EU published an Information Note to EU business operating and/or investing in Crimea/Sevastopol.

The new version of this note includes updates about relevant regulations as well as more information about precautions to take when doing business in the region.

On the last page, it provides links to further information on

The Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act (CAATSA) was signed into law by President Trump on August 2, 2017. This put in motion several deadlines, three of which are due next Monday, January 29, 2018.

Based on past experience, the Trump administration may not meet these deadlines. Nonetheless, it is clear that the impact of

In December 2017, the Government of Venezuela announced the adoption of a new digital currency called Petro—backed by Venezuelan oil resources—in what it described as an attempt to avoid the impact of U.S. Financial Sanctions. On January 19, OFAC published a new Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) offering its view that the proposed currency may

The U.S. Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) published new guidance in October related to the implementation of the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act (CAATSA). As we have previously summarized, the new law is divided into three parts: Title I-Sanctions with Respect to Iran; Title II-Sanctions with Respect to the Russian

On August 2, President Trump signed into law the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act of 2017 (CAATSA), which imposes new sanctions on Russia, Iran, and North Korea.

While President Trump noted his view that the legislation was “significantly flawed”, its passage represents the successful culmination of months of Congressional negotiations and its provisions

With a pause on Capitol Hill because of the July 4th recess, many are taking stock of the prospects for the Senate passed legislation intended to dramatically expand sanctions on Russia. Specifically, a bipartisan group of Senators reached a compromise to combine several pending Russia-related measures and attach them as an amendment to S.722 – The Countering

New U.S. sanctions were announced last week on Cuba, Russia, and Iran, though none of the new restrictions has an immediate effect.

After weeks of internal deliberations, President Trump on June 16 partially fulfilled a campaign pledge by announcing a limited re-implementation of sanctions on Cuba. The new Cuba measures will only take effect after

The U.S. Department of State issued a press release on the third anniversary of the occupation of Crimea stating, “The United States does not recognize Russia’s “referendum” of March 16, 2014, nor its attempted annexation of Crimea and continued violation of international law. We once again reaffirm our commitment to Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.”

On December 29, 2016, the President issued an Executive Order, “Taking Additional Steps To Address The National Emergency With Respect To Significant Malicious Cyber-Enabled Activities.” This amended Executive Order (EO) 13694, “Blocking the Property of Certain Persons Engaging in Significant Malicious Cyber-Enabled Activities,” increasing its scope to allow for the “imposition of sanctions on