In ruling NY N306782, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) discussed the classification of charging mousepads from China. The items are the PowerTrack Wireless Charging Mousepad and the PowerTrack Plush Wireless Charging Mousepad. Both are constructed of cellular plastic with a covering of polyester microfiber, has an embedded 10 W wireless inductive charging coil, LED status indicators, and a USB port for connecting to a power source. In use, both items are placed on a desk surface for the purpose of interacting with the user’s mouse, or other input unit, while also charging their personal electronic devices.

CBP determined that the applicable subheading for the PowerTrack Wireless Charging Mousepad and the PowerTrack Plush Wireless Charging Mousepad is 8473.30.5100, HTSUS, which provides for “Parts and accessories (other than covers, carrying cases and the like) suitable for use solely or principally with machines of headings 8469 to 8472: Parts and accessories of the machines of heading 8471: Not incorporating a cathode ray tube: Other.” The general rate of duty will be Free.

Products of China classified under subheading 8473.30.5100, HTSUS, unless specifically excluded, are subject to List 3 25% ad valorem rate of duty.  At the time of importation, 9903.88.03, in addition to subheading 8473.30.5100, HTSUS, must be reported.

Print:
Email this postTweet this postLike this postShare this post on LinkedIn
Photo of Frances P. Hadfield Frances P. Hadfield

Frances P. Hadfield is a counsel in Crowell & Moring’s International Trade Group in the firm’s New York office. Her practice focuses on forced labor and withhold release orders (WRO), import regulatory compliance, and customs litigation. She regularly advises corporations on matters involving…

Frances P. Hadfield is a counsel in Crowell & Moring’s International Trade Group in the firm’s New York office. Her practice focuses on forced labor and withhold release orders (WRO), import regulatory compliance, and customs litigation. She regularly advises corporations on matters involving customs compliance, audits, customs enforcement, as well as import penalties.

Frances represents clients before the U.S. Court of International Trade and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, as well as in proceedings at the administrative level. She advises corporations on both substantive federal and state regulatory issues that involve U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the Federal Trade Commission, Food and Drug Administration, and U.S. Fish & Wildlife in matters pertaining to product admissibility, audits, classification, import restrictions, investigations, marking, licenses, origin, penalties, and tariff preference programs.