On August 23, the Customs Tariff Commission of China’s State Council announced the decision to impose approximately $75 billion in additional tariffs on the United States. Beijing’s latest retaliatory tariffs are in response to President Trump’s List 4 Trade Action of $300 billion dollars which USTR published earlier in August.

Mirroring the rollout of U.S.

In June 2018, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) announced additional tariffs on products imported from China. The additional tariffs are part of the U.S.’ response to China’s unfair trade practices related to “the forced transfer of American technology and intellectual property” pursuant to Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974.

On August 13, the United States Trade Representative (USTR) released two additional lists of products that will be subject to a 10 percent tariff on approximately $300 billion worth of imported Chinese goods, pursuant to Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974. The first set of tariffs will go into effect on September 1,

On August 13, 2019, the FAR Council will publish in the Federal Register an interim rule, FAR Subpart 4.21, effective immediately, which implements a portion of section 889 of the FY 2019 National Defense Authorization Act, specifically, the ban on government procurement of any equipment, system or service that uses covered telecommunications equipment or

The Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) released three distinct batches of product exclusion requests from its Section 301 tariffs during July and early-August.

A recent International Trade Commission (ITC) case shows that, although rarely used, the ITC remains a viable option for parties pursuing trade secret misappropriation claims. Trade secret claims can be brought under Section 337(a)(1)(A)’s catch-all for other “unfair methods of competition and unfair acts in the importation of articles”—often called “non-statutory” claims—and can result in

On July 18th, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) sanctioned seven companies and five individuals involved in the procurement of materials for sanctioned elements of Iran’s nuclear program.

Based in Iran, China, and Belgium, these persons allegedly obtained items for Iran’s Centrifuge Technology Company (TESA), an entity previously designated