Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA)

On November 29th, the Department of Justice unveiled a revised Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) Enforcement policy that provides significant incentives for corporations to voluntarily self-disclose potential FCPA violations.

The new policy makes permanent many aspects of a pilot program started under the Obama Administration with one significant enhancement: a presumption of a corporate declination

Department of Justice

  • On October 4, a retired U.S. Army colonel was charged with one count of conspiracy to violate the Foreign Corrupt Practices act (FCPA) and the Travel Act and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering in an indictment filed in the District of Massachusetts. The indictment is connected to his

Bureau of Industry and Security

  • On August 31, BIS announced a Settlement Agreement with Narender Sharma and his company Hydel Engineering Products (Hydel/Sharma), both of Rumpur Bushahr, India. Hydel/Sharma was charged with one count of Conspiracy to Export Items from the U.S. to an Iranian Government Entity without Authorization. The purpose of the conspiracy was

Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS)

  • On June 8, BIS entered into a Settlement Agreement with Axis Communications, Inc. of Massachusetts to settle charges of 15 alleged violations of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR). The company was assessed a $700,000 civil penalty and directed to conduct an external audit of its export compliance program by

Jun.21.2017

Last Friday, the Department of Justice publicly disclosed another declination under its FCPA pilot program. This is the sixth public declination by the Department since first launching the program in April 2016 (as previously discussed in a Crowell & Moring alert). It also represents the first public declination since the Department announced the