On August 6, 2020, the President issued two Executive Orders (the EOs) pursuant to the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA) and the National Emergencies Act (NEA) prohibiting U.S. persons from engaging in transactions with the Chinese-owned parent companies of the mobile applications (apps) TikTok and WeChat.  The prohibitions begin 45 days after the

New Business Guidance to Address Supply Chain Risks and Considerations

The Departments of State, Treasury, Commerce, and Homeland Security issued guidance on July 1, 2020 titled “Risks and Considerations for Businesses with Supply Chain Exposure to Entities Engaged in Forced Labor and other Human Rights Abuses in Xinjiang” (the “advisory”).  The advisory broadly

Date: Tuesday, June 23, 2020

Time: 12:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

Duration: 1 hour, 30 minutes

In the past several years, the U.S. government has issued a series of sweeping Executive Orders, policy announcements, and other regulatory and enforcement actions as part of a multi-pronged approach to protect U.S. national interests against the perceived challenges

COVID-19 has disrupted and will continue disrupting supply chains in many important ways, as suppliers, carriers and buyers navigate the global pandemic. But does the pandemic allow activation of force majeure clauses in your contracts? If a force majeure clause is activated, what are the rights and responsibilities of each party during the pandemic? When

On May 15, 2020, President Trump issued an executive order establishing the “Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force” required by the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) implementing bill. Section 741 of the USMCA Implementation Act requires the Department of Homeland Security the Task Force as the central hub for the U.S. government’s enforcement of the prohibition on imports

Wednesday, April 15 at 11:00 am EDT – 12:00 pm EDT

During these difficult times global businesses must streamline and protect their supply chain operations, manage new sourcing, navigate border issues, keep abreast of rapidly changing regulations, and deal with contract disputes. Importers and other businesses in the supply chain who take key steps now

Apr.03.2020

Introduction

We are in extraordinary times.

Businesses are having to adapt, fire-fight and problem-solve like never before. Markets are fluctuating in ways that were totally unforeseeable six months ago and sometimes only days ago. Most companies are now operating in an entirely new world of demand behaviours, supply chain constraints and pricing practices.

This

Apr.03.2020

The COVID-19 pandemic presents unique and unprecedented challenges to the ongoing need to protect confidential information and trade secrets. The massive business disruptions that enterprises of all kinds now face include (1) entire workforces forced to work remotely, accessing and using confidential information and trade secrets from home; (2) exigent circumstances created by the

April 1, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has or will disrupt performance under at least some contracts of virtually all businesses.  No matter which side of the contract you are on or the industry or the specific situation, if the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted performance of your commercial contracts there are a wide variety of considerations