As the U.S. government continues to ratchet up sanctions in response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, public reporting suggests there may be a new target in the sites of U.S. sanctions authorities: Kaspersky Labs (Kaspersky), the popular Russian cybersecurity and antivirus company. Any sanctions imposed by the Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) would come on the heels of other recent government action against Kaspersky. On March 25, 2022, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) added Kaspersky to its list of communications equipment and services that are deemed to pose an unacceptable risk to the national security of the United States, as well as the safety and security of the American people. Kaspersky, which is headquartered in Moscow, is the first non-Chinese company added to the list that includes Shenzhen-based Huawei Technologies Company and ZTE Corporation, among others.  Kaspersky has publicly disagreed with the decision.

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Photo of Caroline Brown Caroline Brown

Caroline E. Brown is a partner in Crowell & Moring’s Washington, D.C. office and a member of the firm’s White Collar & Regulatory Enforcement and International Trade groups and the steering committee of the firm’s National Security Practice. She provides strategic advice to…

Caroline E. Brown is a partner in Crowell & Moring’s Washington, D.C. office and a member of the firm’s White Collar & Regulatory Enforcement and International Trade groups and the steering committee of the firm’s National Security Practice. She provides strategic advice to clients on national security matters, including anti-money laundering (AML) and economic sanctions compliance and enforcement challenges, investigations, and cross border transactions, including review by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) and the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. Telecommunications Services Sector (Team Telecom).

Caroline brings over a decade of experience as a national security attorney at the U.S. Departments of Justice and the Treasury. At the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division, she worked on counterespionage, cybersecurity, and counterterrorism matters and investigations, and gained unique insight into issues surrounding data privacy and cybersecurity. In that role, she also sat on both CFIUS and Team Telecom and made recommendations to DOJ senior leadership regarding whether to mitigate, block, or allow transactions under review by those interagency committees. She also negotiated, drafted, and reviewed mitigation agreements, monitored companies’ compliance with those agreements, and coordinated and supervised investigations of breaches of those agreements.

Photo of Evan D. Wolff Evan D. Wolff

Evan D. Wolff is a partner in Crowell & Moring’s Washington, D.C. office, where he is co-chair of the firm’s Chambers USA-ranked Privacy & Cybersecurity Group and a member of the Government Contracts Group. Evan has a national reputation for his deep technical…

Evan D. Wolff is a partner in Crowell & Moring’s Washington, D.C. office, where he is co-chair of the firm’s Chambers USA-ranked Privacy & Cybersecurity Group and a member of the Government Contracts Group. Evan has a national reputation for his deep technical background and understanding of complex cybersecurity legal and policy issues. Calling upon his experiences as a scientist, program manager, and lawyer, Evan takes an innovative approach to developing blended legal, technical, and governance mechanisms to prepare companies with rapid and comprehensive responses to rapidly evolving cybersecurity risks and threats. Evan has conducted training and incident simulations, developed response plans, led privileged investigations, and advised on hundreds of data breaches where he works closely with forensic investigators. Evan also counsels businesses on both domestic and international privacy compliance matters, including the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), and the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). He is also a Registered Practitioner under the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) framework.

Photo of Alexander Urbelis Alexander Urbelis

Alex Urbelis is a senior counsel in the New York office and a member of the Privacy & Cybersecurity Group. Alex has more than 20 years of experience in the information security community and has varied experience as a Chief Information Security Officer…

Alex Urbelis is a senior counsel in the New York office and a member of the Privacy & Cybersecurity Group. Alex has more than 20 years of experience in the information security community and has varied experience as a Chief Information Security Officer (CISO), Chief Compliance Officer, in-house counsel, and private practice litigator.

Alex has a unique skill set that has allowed him to create a bridge between the technical and legal side of cybersecurity. As a result, he is the primary architect of an exclusive DNS (Domain Name Search) monitoring and intelligence platform. Through this intel platform, Alex advises his clients on identified and early-stage indicators of cybersecurity threats and provides counsel on legal actions and technical defensive remedies to neutralize those threats. Alex tracks sophisticated cyber adversaries and advanced persistent threats (APTs) through his intel platform and, notably, detected a state-sponsored cyber intrusion attempt targeting the World Health Organization in March 2020. For combining legal and technical skill sets with public service, the Financial Times selected Alex as a finalist for its Innovative Lawyers awards for pandemic response in 2020.